Thursday, February 25, 2016

Pork New York Strip Steak

by Ryan Anderes

This weekend, we are offering a generous 14 ounce pork New York strip steak with a vidalia onion demi glaze. This cut of meat is what White Marble Farms is all about, and that is pork! Raised on farms right here in the Midwest, this pork is specially bred to produce only the finest, most tender, juiciest pork on the market.


The result is meats that are consistent in color and generous in their marbling, for an out of this world culinary experience, no matter the cut. So, when did pork become referred to as a New York strip? I thought that was meant for beef?

Well, in 2013 the referencing of pork cuts changed. The National Cattlemen's Beef Association decided that Americans needed more clarity on the meats they were purchasing. So they began to change the names of cuts to something that us Americans could more easily identify with. The old, hard-to-understand labels were based on lists created in the 1970s. They were very anatomical, describing cuts based on their location in the animal. That information remains on the new labels, but it's second after the new cut name. For example what was once called boneless beef loin top sirloin cubes for kabobs is now simply "kabobs."

Chop is simply the pork word for steak. All chops come from the loin muscle, which runs from a hog's shoulder to the hip. The top of the muscle is more tender than the bottom. Those chops will get names reminiscent of the cuts used to describe steaks that consumers are already familiar with:
  • What used to be top loin pork chops will now be New York chops.
  • A pork loin rib chop will now be a ribeye chop.
  • There's even a bone-in pork loin chop called a T-Bone chop. 

The new pork names go with a shift in how pork is cooked. Trichinosis (a disease caused by eating meat that has not been thoroughly cooked) is no longer a problem in U.S. hogs, and in 2011, the Department of Agriculture changed the recommended cooking temperature for pork from 160 degrees to 145. Once pork could be pink, a pork chop could be cooked just like a steak.

White Marble Farms Features & Benefits

  • Exceptionally tender and juicy, with a deep, rich natural flavor.
  • No added preservatives, fillers or flavoring solutions of any kind.
  • Bred from a unique line of animals for superior meat.
  • White Marble Farms Premium Pork is USDA Process Verified.
  • All products are source verified, pork quality assurance approved and selected for quality.
  • Specially selected for color and marbling for a consistently world-class eating experience.

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